Common mistake - each or every


We use each to refer to individual things in a group or a list of two or more things. It is often similar in meaning to every, but we use every to refer to a group or list of three or more things.

We use adverbs such as almost, practically and nearly with every, but not with each:

Almost every car in the car park was new.

Not: Almost each car …

Practically every house now has at least two televisions.

Not: Practically each house …

We can use each of + pronoun or each of + determiner + noun, but with every we must use every one + pronoun or every one + determiner + noun:

Each of us has a bicycle.

Every one of us has a bicycle.

Not: Every of us …

Each of the children received a special gift.

Every one of the children received a special gift.

Not: Every of the children …

#Commonmistake #grammar